Site Archives church records

Catholic Genealogy Q & A: Conditional Baptism


What is a “conditional baptism”? Consider the language of the following baptismal record from 1913 in Quebec Province, Canada: “We, the undersigned parish priest, have received the abjuration from heresy of _____, Protestant, adult: a Seduce Your Ex: Get Your Ex-boyfriend Back lso her profession of the Roman Catholic Faith. We have given conditional baptism […]

Family Naming Patterns: A Good Research Strategy


Last week I was researching an Irish family. From the 1911 census, I knew that Michael was married to Mary, was born in County Westmeath in about 1850, was married before 1892 (oldest living child was born 1892), and I knew the names of their living children. My plan was to go after the couple’s […]

Another Online Resource for English Genealogists


The collection of records at Ancestry.com continues to grow. Lately Ancestry.com has begun to fill in holes for researchers who have been studying their London ancestors. Anyone with experience of London research will know just how challenging, and most of all, how time consuming it can be. The transcription of Church of England burial and […]

Catholic Church Records: 1907 & 1918 Reporting Requirements


Beginning in 1907, the Roman Catholic Church worldwide required that a Catholic person’s marriage be reported to his or her place of baptism. The 1907 decree Ne Temere required that marriages be noted on one’s baptismal record. They are usually noted on the side of the baptism record. Compliance with this decree varied, especially in […]

English County Record Offices and Online Resources


There are many excellent resources out there for the genealogists studying their English heritage. We all know about sites such as Ancestry.com, FindMyPast.com and the the like. However, the English county record offices and other county-level governmental bodies are slowly but surely digitizing a great deal of old records. It is interesting that many of […]

Thank You Mr. Tax Man!


It happens every year and for some, every quarter. The saying goes that there is nothing more certain than death and taxes. We all hate having the government reach into our pockets and take our cash, but for those of us who love genealogy and family history, the tax man can be a real boon […]

The Prudence of Double-Checking


I recently came across the following item which may be of interest to anyone currently pursuing their English heritage. Glance over the following two documents and note the discrepancy in the marriage data for Thomas Bracegirdle and Jane Hatton. The first is a civil copy of the marriage, dated 1843, while the second is the […]